Horse Racing, Lady’s Secret, Impressionist Fay Mowery Moore

$1,150.00

Oil (with oil gouache highlights) on canvas measures 18″ x 28″ , signed lower right

Original gold frame measures 24″ x 34″ ; Painting & frame in very good original condition.

Titled on the reverse: “Lady’s Secret bursts from the pack”

Availability: In stock

Fay Moore (1920-2016) is one of the first women to receive recognition as a “sports artist.”  Although she is best known for her thoroughbred racing scenes, Moore has not limited herself to just one sport; instead, she has painted hockey, football, baseball, and squash. Her focus and success with outstanding collectors became centered on her interpretation of thoroughbred racing and resulted in a number of mural commissions for racetracks and related corporations across the country. An experienced draughtsman and a loosely impressionistic colorist, she is well-informed in classical anatomy and composition. She describes her painting as “neo-pointillist.”  In easel-scale work of recent years, her signature style of many layered inks, watercolors, gouaches and pastels has attracted awards, reviews and articles.

A Renaissance woman who has worked in fashion, stage-design and window display, she has been on the faculty of the Yale Graduate School of Drama, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Kansas City.  She is now represented in museums and college collections. Having studied painting earlier with such diverse masters as hard-edge pioneer Paul Feeley at Benninton College and colorist Henry Hensche at the Cape Cod School of Art, her professional painting career began in the 1960s.

Moore’s work can be seen in a variety of galleries, museums, and magazines; including Heike Pickett Gallery in Lexington-Versailles, KY; Frost and Reed in London; The Sporting Gallery in Middleburg, VA; the Kentucky Derby Museum, and The Artist’s Magazine. She wa a Trustee of the National Art Museum of Sport, chairman of The American Academy of Equine Art, and an officer of the National Arts Club where she maintained a studio.